Antibiotics: Much Ado About Something

If you take an antibiotic every time you or your child has a fever, think things through again. Colds and most sore throats, alongside influenza and other viral infections, do not respond to the bacteria-killing properties of these very powerful medicines. Instead, the illness should run its course, as the immune system functions as a healer.

So when to take antibiotics? Below is a primer on these wonder medicines and the bacterial infections they can combat.

Bacterial vs. Viral

If you take an antibiotic every time you or your child has a fever, think things through again. Colds and most sore throats, alongside influenza and other viral infections, do not respond to the bacteria-killing properties of these very powerful medicines. Instead, the illness should run its course, as the immune system functions as a healer.

So when to take antibiotics? Below is a primer on these wonder medicines and the bacterial infections they can combat.

Bacterial vs. Viral

Most diseases infect our bodies via microbes. Viruses and bacteria are different in size, structure and method of multiplication, not to mention the ways in which they are treated. While doctors have secure and effective vaccines to protect us from a number of viruses, they do not have safe and efficacious medications to cure or treat most of them.

Penicillin made it possible

Penicillin was first talked about in 1944. Nowadays, antibiotics are among the most prescribed medications in the world, either fighting off microorganisms cleary and completely or stopping their reproduction.

Disadvantage of a very upside medication

Antibiotics can cause many more health problems, when they are not used in the right way. Widespread use and misuse in the ill over time have jeopardized antibiotics' ability to fight off microbes. At the present time, nearly all bacteria are insensitive to the properties of the very potent medications, so that more recently developed antibiotics are sometimes needed to stop infections that were once easily treatable. Antibiotics can also cause complications, such as diarrhea and vaginal yeast infections.

So the next time you want to take an antibiotic to avert a cold, ask your family doctor how to handle the symptoms instead. Do not be surprised if your doctor has suggested 'watchful waiting' to see if symptoms eventually merit a prescription.

When you are taking an antibiotic, observe instructions. Your dosage has been calculated to kill microbes throughout the course of the sickness. So, if you do not finish, you may find yourself at the risk of leaving enough germs in your body to re-start the infection - despite the fact that you are feeling good. The remaining medicine will not be sufficient to kill the microbes the next time, and it may even make them resistant to antibiotics.

The most suitable option to lessen the risk of antibiotic resistance is to avoid getting sick in the first place.

Washing hands is the most effective step you can take to prevent transmitting diseases. So scrub with warm, soapy water for at least fifteen seconds, then rinse thoroughly. This is your part for prevention.


Article Source: http://www.ArticleStreet.com/


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